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Election 2016 Ward 10 Responses

Ward 10

Rickey Turchet
Jerry Flegel
Brian Sklar

Rickey Turchet

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

I would agree that  a complete athletics or sports strategy developed by Cities adds to the benefits stated in your question.  If we look at the type and level of migration coming to our Cities and specifically to Regina we are seeing other sports putting a demand on our playing fields like cricket and soccer to name a few.  I can’t comment on what Regina’s needs regarding cycling until I have all of the facts and metrics.  However, Regina has a vast park and trail system that goes through the City that is the envy of many Cities.  A cycling strategy has to encompass safety and timing.  Cycling is a short season so a strategy for outdoor use during the best weather is imperative.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities. Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

The City has current networks within the City however the City could have these discussion with the Developers of new subdivisions etc.  It’s a ‘pay as you play’ system, in other words clubs, teams and sports associations pay to use sports facilities, upgrades and to sustain it over the long term.  I would ask who would pay for the bicycle infrastructure and the sustainability of it over the long term?  We can’t always expect that Government will always pay for these things and there must be some type of shared costs.  I would welcome a discussion how this would look like.  For example the new football field at Douglas Park is funded by Private money, fundraising, the Regina Minor Football association and some City funds.  These are the type of relationships we have to look at in the future.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

Growing up I had a 1 speed red bike and grew up on a hill, a very, very steep hill. It provided a fitness advantage to me because I had to ride up that hill, many times walked my bike up that hill (especially after soccer practice), but the training at a young age made me stronger and gave me an advantage over other kids.  I rode my bike everywhere and eventually got a 10 speed when I was 13.  I was able to play competitive soccer and played Football at the University of Western Ontario because of my speed and core strength which I attribute to riding my bike at an early age (for about 10 years) and building the appropriate muscles.

I have a mountain bike and usually take it out once per year, but I don’t have the time anymore and envy those that still have the time to ride.

Jerry Flegel

No Response

Brian Sklar

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 9 Responses

Ward 9

Aiden Wotherspoon
Jason Mancinelli

Aidan Wotherspoon

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

As I have stated elsewhere, Regina needs to become a safe city for bicycles; right now unfortunately it is not. With the exception of the Devonian pathways, it is impossible to commute by bicycle from one area of the city to another. The two bike lanes we currently have downtown are pathetic. What we need is to have major streets like McCarthy Boulevard and Sherwood Drive with dedicated bike lanes. If necessary, I would support bike lane designs that place a physical barrier between the bikes and vehicular traffic. I would also support a plan to expand the Devonian pathway system to make the north eastern part of the city accessible from it via northwest link.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities. Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

Given the area of the city I am in, I would start by concentrating on new developments. I will work to make sure that safety for cyclists is built into the structural fabric of Coopertown. I talked elsewhere of my plan to have pedestrian lights and sidewalks on Courtney Street before the new schools open to keep students safe. I would propose an expansion of the Northwest Link pathway at least up to Whelan drive to provide a logical entry point into the new development, and the existing neighbourhood to the east of the road. I would also propose producing a map, to be updated regularly, designed for cyclists that highlight the safest roads and pathways in the city to help commuters map out safe routes to different areas of the city.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

The last bike ride I did was from a friend’s house by Al Ritchie to my place by McLurg School. I liked the scenery starting at Candy Cane Park and taking the bike paths through Mount Royal up to Hansen Park and taking the scenic route on the North Storm Channel pathway by St. Josphat.

Jason Mancinelli

Election 2016 Ward 8 Responses

Ward 8

David Chapados

Michael O’Donnell

Gene Howie

Ron Blashill

David Chapados

 

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

I would push for more well defined bike lanes, also upgrades and extensions to existing bike paths. I believe bike lanes could be made a lot safer by creating grade differences or meridians between bike lanes and automotive traffic. It would make bike lanes more clearly defined, improving safety for all user groups. We have a great bike path system that runs through the city, but a lot of sections of it are in need of immediate repair. Also a lot of newer developments haven’t been connected to existing infrastructure as well as they could’ve been. If we looked at bike paths the same way we do streets, and actually made them a functional way to get around the city. I’m sure we would see a major increase in usage, which in turn would lessen traffic congestion and stress on roadways.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

 I think adding connecting paths from the already existing bike path would be the most efficient way to hasten development. As well bike lanes that are already in place outside of the bike path need to be made safer and advertised better. I believe if you wouldn’t go for a bike ride with your child on it, it doesn’t qualify as a bike lane.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

To be completely honest I haven’t rode a bike in sometime. Although I do use the bike path and bike lanes a couple times a week, skating to work, the skate park in Wascana park, or going for a roll with my daughter. I absolutely love getting out and having fun as a means to stay in good shape and healthy. Whether It’s skating to work at 5:00 am or the 9km warm up skate from my house in Rosemont to the skate park beside the Science Centre. As a fairly regular user of bicycle infrastructure I’m definitely for promoting it’s usage and improving it’s functionality.

Michael O’Donnell

No Response

Gene Howie

No Response

Ron Blashill

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 7 Responses

Ward 7

James Dulmage
Leanne McKay
Nishchal Bhagi
Jonas Cossette
Sharron Bryce
Ameer Gill
John Gross

James Dulmage

1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

Regina needs a complete review of bike paths and roads to determine how best to tackle this issue. We need to develop more options for cyclists, especially in terms of road space. I am ready to stand up and support anything that creates a benefit to the environment and to the health of people. I do feel that cyclists should be encouraged to take a road safety course for both the benefit of themselves and others on the road, so I would be strongly for developing this type of program. We could also start offering a subsidy to encourage more cycling.

2. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

We need to change our way of thinking. We need to focus on how to get people moving about a city in a healthy and environmentally friendly fashion. It requires smart investment and good planning techniques to execute this. I would work with the rest of the city and its citizens, especially current cyclists, to develop a plan for our city to begin converting existing roads to include attractive bike paths and to ensure new roads have this option right off the bat.

3. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

It’s been a long time! I haven’t rode a bike since I was a teenager, but it would have been on the bike paths near Walker School! I loved being able to just relax and enjoy the scenery while doing something healthy.

Leanne McKay

1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

My only caution in developing a municipal cycling strategy is the 5 or 6-month period when weather allows bike travel in Regina. Spending taxpayer money on anything that is not a universal service is not at the top of my list – spending taxpayer money on something not at the top of my list and only a viable service part of the year is something that will have to be considered a want rather than a need. Please do not interpret this to mean I do not support your position or efforts, on the contrary – I totally support what you are doing and what you stand for. That being said, however, we have some very upset taxpayers who just shelled out 73 million for a football stadium. That isn’t even on most people’s wants list much less the needs list.

Bike policy and infrastructure are on my lists right there with outdoor swimming pools, ball diamonds, parks etc, which are the responsibility of the City. My position is very firm with respect to wants vs needs. Take care of the needs first, we need water; sewer, streets; sidewalks, garbage pick-up; disposal, police; firemen. Those universal services are used by everyone and needed by every citizen of this City. Within the streets and sidewalks services, we need I support designated bike lanes and I also intend to promote the concept of the community bicycle program.

It is a free bike lending program – very successful and really addresses Regina’s unique challenges of bicycle theft. Bikes are free to use – there are pick-up and return depots throughout the city and I honestly believe it would help enormously with the parking issue in downtown Regina.

I am sure you know more about the Community Bike Program concept than I do and I will be the first to consult with your Organization on how Regina’s Program should look.

Sadly, new construction of protected bike paths and routes is something that will have to wait. We have to pay for the football stadium first. You may thank all the incumbents for that debt on Regina taxpayers.

However, you cast your vote remember it was the incumbent Mayor and Councill who put us in debt for a facility we did not need and many did not even want. It is high time the many stops paying for the wants of the few.

2. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

I have addressed that concern to some extent in the previous answer. We can’t do anything until that football stadium is paid for. If we have Federal or Provincial money that needs to be matched by the City to take advantage of a ten-year investment plan we can’t do it. I would so love to but we have a football stadium and the incumbent Mayor and Council don’t seem to realize just how badly that is going to restrict and eliminate tending to the things we really need and want. A new Mayor and Council are bound to honour the commitments of the previous administration so our hands will be tied to some extent but I do hope new faces and new minds on Council will better reflect the actual desires of the majority, not the privileged elite.

3. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

I am 63 years old and suffer a visual impairment so it has been about five or six years since I rode a bike.

The last time I rode a bike I was sharing a beautiful and sunny Fall day here in Regina near the Pasqua Hospital with my eldest daughter.  We were just soaking in the sun and enjoying each other’s company.  She passed away just a little over two years later.  It is a memory burned into my brain that I will never forget.

In the past when I was a young woman I biked everywhere.  I had a baby seat on the back of my bike when I was in University and I found that biking helped me maintain an amazing figure and a fabulous tan and I never had to worry about where the heck to park.  It saved so much time, and money and kept me healthy and beautiful and I loved it.  All my girlfriends started riding bikes with baby seats and pull behind carts and we looked so amazing. We started to notice reduced stress levels from the exercise and fresh air and for me, it also provided a special little quiet time to meditate on the day that had just passed or the day ahead.  I really miss it and wish I could still ride.

Nishchal Bhagi

No Response

Jonas Cossette

No Response

Sharron Bryce

No Response

Ameer Gill

No Response

John Gross

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 6 Responses

Ward 6

Connie Deiter
Shelley Lavallee
Bill Stevenson
Joel Murray
Femi Ogunrinde
David Lerat
Trace Yellowtail
Joe Daniels
Ashley Deacon

Connie Deiter

Good afternoon:  I am an active person, a runner for the past 37 yrs and yes, I bike not as much as I like to but its part of my summer activities.  I am not familiar with the current strategies for improving bike usage but would be in favor of designated lanes and parking for bikes.  In addition, looking at some policies regarding better safety practices for trucks and other vehicles on the road.  My nephew lost his leg in a biking accident with a large commercial truck in Regina a few years ago, I am very interested in seeing a safer strategy for bike riders in Regina.  I rode a bike last summer around the city and in the park.  take care Connie

Shelley Lavallee

 

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

Absolutely I am in favor of cycling and having more bike paths, lanes and bike friendly places and spaces. Will encourage the community associations to develop cycling strategies within their community plans for cleaner, greener, healthier spaces.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

I will support and encourage any progressive strategies and investments that will result in more bike ridership and associated infrastructure.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

Sadly, my bicycle went missing in action. I last rode in the summer, I love the feeling of strengthening my legs and taking moments to enjoy the surroundings and personal bests in completing goals. I am more of a casual rider, and I haven’t been in a bike group. If there is a program for beginners or slow pokes, let me know. I’m more into quality and personal satisfaction versus high speeds or long distance at this point in my journey…although I am open for change.

I will be shopping online throughout the winter looking for a new bicycle…looking for ideas.

 Bill Stevenson

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

I have always enjoyed trail cycling either through Wascana Trails, the TransCanada Trail or any of the numerous local Regina trails any day is a great day to cycle.  The Regina Revitalization Initiative is a great place to begin a new cycling strategy with investment and creation of bike lanes not only into downtown but as a starting point to many other parts of the city.

Currently there are great trails throughout the city via park trails but I know serious cyclers are looking for more than recreational cycling. While no one plan will solve all our problems I believe a study to expand our cycling lanes from residential areas to commercial and business zones will help to encourage additional cycling as an option.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

I would review past studies to see viable ideas, consult with the local cycling community, ask for a study on current conditions with the development of the RRI in mind and work to create additional options for cycle lanes. An possible solution is taking a couple of middle streets by the warehouse district and changing them to one ways and include a cycle lane going north/south. Other streets and avenues could be studied with the mind for further cycling development.

I’d expand this study to include what other city’s in similar climates have done to encourage cycling.

I’d love to see the walking overpass from the CP Railyard to Downtown Regina include enough room for cyclers to walk their bikes over (safety reason).

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

This summer I rode extensively on the trails surrounding the city on my 18 speed mountain bike and I loved the freedom to just go.

Joel Murray

No Response

Femi Oguninde

No Response

David Lerat

No Response

Trace Yellowtail

No Response

Joe Daniels

No Response

Ashley Deacon

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 4 Responses

Ward 4

Lori Bresciani
Chad Novak
Byron Burnett
Asfaw Debia

Lori Bresciani

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

First I think we need to make Regina more of a bike friendly city, So people feel safe riding their bike.

I would like to meet with the Bike Regina advocacy group to find out more to collaborate to develop a municipal  cycling strategy together for Regina.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities. Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

Again, I think it is important to come up with a cycling strategy and plan to move forward to ensure it is safe etc.

Then partner with both federal and provincial on “green” initiatives to move forward to put the infrastructure investment plan in place.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

In the Creeks subdivision on the paths, out and around the creek.  It is such a great way to exercise, to enjoy the fresh air and get out and enjoy our city.

Chad Novak

 

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

From my understanding, Bike Regina had a good representation with the responses to the Official Community Plan, and I am very pleased to see that. Unfortunately, it is also my understanding that the City of Regina has failed to execute much of their promises in this Plan that would see Regina become a cycling-friendly community. I don’t think we need to reinvent the wheel here, pardon the pun, because your organization has already expressed what it sees as successful strategies to make our City much more cycle-friendly. As a City Councillor, I would push hard to ensure your positions are listened to and acted upon in a timely manner. Ideally, I would like to see a committee struck that included representatives from your group and others in the cycling community in order to ensure we are doing everything we reasonably can to make effective change in our City.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

Those are the key words: protected bicycle infrastructure. Simply painting lines on roads are not enough to provide a viable alternative to attract more to the cycling option of commuting around our City. We need to have protected bike lanes and bike paths in order to encourage more and more citizens to opt to take their bikes to work, to school or just for a leisurely ride on a sunny day. This is where the committee would be essential in ensuring that these kind of projects are given priority both on a funding basis and a construction basis.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

My wife and I ride our bikes around our local park here in the Greens on Gardiner. I will be the first to admit, we don’t do it nearly as often as we’d like or should, but it is a relaxing and enjoyable way to get in touch with nature. I love riding on separate pathways that are truly intended for bicycles and walking, rather than streets where you are often taking your life in your own hands. Ideally, I would love to see a fully interconnected network of paths all around our City, so that all neighbourhoods are as connected to each other by bike/walking paths as they are by roads.

Byron Burnett

No Response

Asfaw Debia

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 3 Responses

Ward 3

Amanda Baker

Brian Rieder

Tamara Knight

Jeanne Clive

Andrew Stevens

____________________________________________________________________

Andrew Stevens

 Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

For starters, cycling should be seen as part of a comprehensive public transportation strategy, and in the City’s Transportation Master Plan, it is. That also means designing communities and new developments around walkability, convenient access to public transit, and cycling needs. Here we need to talk about the Official Community Plan and Neighbourhood plans. So let’s get started with what exists and fund recommendations that have already been crafted. I’m ready to support the creation of dedicated bike lanes and the growth of shared (marked) roadways. In terms of a strategy, I would first need to see what kind of data already exists and, if necessary, expand on this work through public consultation and research. We need to make sure that the strategy is evidence-based and effective.

Considering that over 30,000 residents work in the downtown core, and another 20,000 are employed in the surrounding areas, Ward 3 is just the place to launch pilot projects. That means improving cycling access and infrastructure to and from downtown. Here I would reach out to the Regina Downtown Business Improvement District to see how the city and BID can facilitated improvements together. We already have a number of bike lanes on one-way streets leading to the downtown on a north-south corridor, but what we need now is dedicated cycling space on major east-west roadways. That means look at 13th Avenue, 14th Avenue, 15th Avenue, and Victoria Avenue as a starting points.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

My response to this question depends on my cycling experience that day. If I’ve struggled to avoid being hit by traffic or running into parked cars on a heavily trafficked road going into the downtown core, here’s my response: give me a group of volunteers, a can of paint, and a roller and I’ll give you a new bike line by tomorrow afternoon. How’s that for hastening the construction of local networks? But it’s not that easy.

As Councilor, I would review the existing recommendations available in Regina’s Transportation Master Plan. It’s surprisingly progressive and attentive to the importance of improving public transportation and cycling infrastructure. Let’s start there. A lot of expertise and public consultation time was invested into the development of that solid document. What it reveals is that relatively little money has been invested into cycling infrastructure and other forms of transportation. Between 2009 and 2014, only 15% of the Transportation Capital Budget Allocation was invested in transit, active transportation, and multi-modal infrastructure. The rest went into roadways, bridge infrastructure renewal, traffic control and safety, streetscape development, and safety improvements. Yes that’s important stuff but we need think big. Per-capita spending on active transportation is about $3, compared to $4 in Winnipeg and $8 in Edmonton. My objective is to change that.

Keep in mind that improving cycling infrastructure and encouraging residents to use a bike is far less expensive than people are meant to believe. Bikes don’t need new roads or pathways; we just need to secure dedicated space. That means increasing the number of shared lanes (on roads and certain sidewalks) and, most importantly, launching bike-only lanes that are protected by a curb or other barriers. People that say this can’t be done on wide, prairie city roads should probably visit other Canadian cities where the work’s been done. Even Saskatoon has made advances in this area. Regina just needs to catch up! The City should also create commuter maps that link existing paths to roadways and areas that enable cycling. There’s no reason why Regina can’t develop creative cycling commuter corridor and map for people to follow. That would be consistent with the direction of recommendations in the Transportation Master Plan.

The research is in, recommendations have been crafted – now it’s just a matter lighting a fire under Council come budget time. But that’s the tough part. Groups like Bike Regina need to continue their lobbying efforts. Challenge Councilors to bike around the city and maybe even commute on two wheels once in a while, if they are able. These folks need to experience the benefits and the challenges. Advocacy also includes letters to the editor, public challenges, op-eds, and other means of presenting data showing the economic benefits associated with improving cycling and public transportation infrastructure. Partnerships between Bike Regina, the city, and the various businesses in the community that sell bikes and related gear can be forged to promote cycling. Maybe we can even talk about raising funds for community-based bike repair clinics, or purchasing helmets, bikes, and bike parts for residents who can’t afford these items. Finally, all municipal buildings and spaces, like parks, need an appropriate amount of space for people to lock up their bikes.

Cars take a toll on our air and our roads, so we need to think of alternatives. Make cycling safer and more efficient is certainly one way to promote this mode of transportation.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

Depending on when you publish my response, it’s likely I last rode my bike to work (University of Regina). And I do that year round. For me riding a bike is both a functional means of getting around and a form of mental relaxation. I love how it lets me unwind after work. It also gives me great relief to take a mix of bike lanes, paths, and side streets home when I know there are a bunch of suckers working their way through rush-hour traffic on their way home. Biking is also a way for me to confront Regina’s long, harsh winters. It’s much better than waiting for a freezing car to warm up!

Amanda Baker

No Response

Brian Rieder

No Response

Tamara Knight

No Response

Jeanne Clive

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 2 Responses

Ward 2

Bob Hawkins

Sam Khan

Laur’Lei Silzer

Syed Tayyab

Carmen Lien

Mike Parisone

_____________________________________________________

Bob Hawkins (incumbent)

Thank you, Bike Regina, for raising the issue of urban cycling during our current municipal campaign.  Your advocacy now, and before Council during many of the meetings at which I have been a councillor, has been effective and has helped us make better policy.  There is an important place for cycling in our transportation planning and now is the right time to make the decisions that will build protected bicycle infrastructure into our transportation planning, something which has not been sufficiently considered in earlier planning.

Bike Regina made key submissions during the processes leading to the development of Regina’s new Official City Plan.  That plan reflects your input.  It calls for the development of, “an inviting and efficient citywide bikeway network to expand on-street and off-street cycling infrastructure to connect key trip generators and destinations,” and for, “streets, pedestrian paths and bike paths that contribute to a network of fully connected, safe and accessible route to all destinations.”  I voted in favour of the adoption of the new Official City Plan and am committed to realising the provisions that I have just quoted.  In short, I would like to see an integrated bikeway system that would facilitate cycling anywhere in the city.

Bicycling safety is a key priority for me.  I do not think that bikes and cars mix easily on our roads.  That is why I feel we should make a strong effort to create separate bike lanes from traffic protected by cement dividers where possible or even better, lanes entirely separate from vehicular traffic.  New federal government infrastructure monies can help with this but it must also be an important consideration as we are rebuilding our streets, something which will become more frequent given the City’s ageing infrastructure, and as we are building new transportation corridors in new subdivisions.

The city also has a role to play in educating motorists and cyclist in safe road usage.

I also want to mention, again emphasising safety, the importance of wearing bike helmets.  We owe that to our friends and our families.  It is important for parents to insist that their children wear proper protective head gear. Our brain is precious, it will not grow back, and we should take great care not to injure it.

I am committed to a complete and connected system of bike paths and to safe biking.  I would be happy to answer any other questions that you might have.

Sam Khan

First, Regina should be designated as a “bike-friendly” city in its advertising and marketing campaigns. Additionally, existing bike riding paths should be advertised on its website and homepage. All future road repayment should be mandated to include  a bike path as part of the overall design. The entire city roadways should be optimally connected by continuous bike-paths since bikes are an alternative means of transportation for many residents, year round.

Regina would do well to adopt tag line that reinforces the message that promoting  healthy environment is one of its main goals. Under that stated goal, activities such as bike-riding should be promoted.Everyone knows that there are many positive health benefits for the environment and citizens when the number of bike-riders increases. Motorists also need to understand the bike-riders’ rules-of-the road as the best way to protect riders’ safety.

The importance of creating sustainable and livable communities can best be served bye promoting a healthy environment for our citizens and encouraging outdoor physical activities whenever possible. Bike-riding is the perfect union    because it markedly reduces pollution and traffic congestion and promotes enhanced physical fitness. Regina must do everything possible to facilitate the safety and convenience of bike-riders.

I enjoy all types of outdoor activities including bike-riding. The experience of being outdoors with the freedom to go wherever you wish is very appealing to me and my daughters. Given the new types of adult bikes available, anyone at any age can now die a bike and benefit from the experience

Laur’Lei Silzer

Thank you for your questions.

I’d like to answer the first two with one statement. I totally support cycling as part of an overall transportation improvement strategy for the city. I am not exceptionally well-versed at this time on the ideas your organization has provided to improve conditions for cycling in Regina, but will certainly spend the time in the very near future to find that out.  I would support additional bicycle-only lanes and other strategies to encourage this as a healthy and logical option to vehicle traffic.

I usually only ride my bike on the bike path as I don’t trust drivers to be courteous especially in heavier traffic.  This too needs to be addressed.

I hope this meets your needs.

Syed Tayyab

No Response

Carmen Lien

No Response

Mike Parisone

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 1 Responses

Ward 1

Barbara Young (Incumbent)

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

The transportation Master Plan has yet to become a public document but it, and Design Regina both have a vision for biking, walking across the city and call for it in greenfield areas. The most recent example is the neighbourhood plan for the South East area just approved by Council, so it is the vision and happening in new neighbourhoods where it can be a part of the original infrastructure.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10- year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities. Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

My question at budget time will ask about immediate plans, when to expect the transportation plan to come forward and what can we expect in the next 2 years.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

A big problem according to my biking family members Is connecting existing routes that already exist. I will bring that forward as well.

I no longer ride a bike. As a great grandmother I am a cheering squad for my family.

Robert (Bob) Burnett

No Response