Wascana Freewheelers events

We’d like you to know about what our friends at Wascana Freewheelers are doing too.

Wascana Freewheelers Bicycle Touring Club
Also on Facebook
Chili Night Kick Off
April 23, 5:00 pm
Cathedral Community Centre
Come for chili, information, meeting new people, door prizes.

We are a recreational club. We like biking, eating, camping, common
adventures, new people.

Coming in May:
Wednesday Night Rides (from legislature, 1 – 1&1/2 hours, ends with coffee or ice cream. All rides have leaders and “sweeps” so no one is ever alone at the back. Great for learning to ride with group.

Weekend Rides – progressive supper, Lumsden for brunch, Kronau for ice cream, Spoke-n-Spa around Moose Jaw, Gone with the Wind ride, camping tours, self-supported tour along highway 22 in Alberta

Education – CanBike Safe Urban Cycling (18 hours) in May, for  anyone who rides on streets
– Adult learn to ride (1/2 day, for
adults who’ve never ridden a bike) in June
– Learn to Tour (carry all camping/gear
on bike) through out June (club has starter gear)

Bike Shop Challenges Council To Bike Through Summer

“I offered to equip city council with bikes for the summer, to be returned on Aug. 31,” Vandelinden said.

So far, only Coun. Andrew Stevens has contacted him back about the challenge.

Stevens currently spends most of his time biking or riding transit to commute, and is up for the challenge and hopes others take it on as well.

Read More at Leader-Post:

Council challenged to bike through the summer

City Council’s Mouth And Money Don’t Align

When it comes to cycling accessibility and options, Regina is one of the worst cities in the Prairie provinces, according to Luke Nichols with Bike Regina.

“I would rate Regina as poor,” Nichols said. “Since the official community plan was passed about three or four years ago, we have implemented one block of cycling infrastructure. That is it. That is the extent of what the city has done.”

Compared to other Prairie cities, Regina seems to lag behind. Saskatoon has an extensive cycling network in development and has implemented protected bike lanes for cyclists in the city. Calgary currently has more than 550 kilometres of pathways and 260 kilometres of on-street bicycle routes.

“Broken down, we have a multi-use pathway system that is 41 kilometres, and it extends throughout the city,” said Geoff Brown, manager of infrastructure planning branch. “As well, we have 21 kilometres of bike lanes.”

Nichols contends that with more bike lanes, more residents would start cycling through the city, creating greater use and need for bike lanes.

“The official community plan found 65 per cent of people were looking to cycle but were scared due to lack of infrastructure,” Nichols said.

Read the rest, at The Leader-Post.

Election 2016 Ward 10 Responses

Ward 10

Rickey Turchet
Jerry Flegel
Brian Sklar

Rickey Turchet

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

I would agree that  a complete athletics or sports strategy developed by Cities adds to the benefits stated in your question.  If we look at the type and level of migration coming to our Cities and specifically to Regina we are seeing other sports putting a demand on our playing fields like cricket and soccer to name a few.  I can’t comment on what Regina’s needs regarding cycling until I have all of the facts and metrics.  However, Regina has a vast park and trail system that goes through the City that is the envy of many Cities.  A cycling strategy has to encompass safety and timing.  Cycling is a short season so a strategy for outdoor use during the best weather is imperative.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities. Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

The City has current networks within the City however the City could have these discussion with the Developers of new subdivisions etc.  It’s a ‘pay as you play’ system, in other words clubs, teams and sports associations pay to use sports facilities, upgrades and to sustain it over the long term.  I would ask who would pay for the bicycle infrastructure and the sustainability of it over the long term?  We can’t always expect that Government will always pay for these things and there must be some type of shared costs.  I would welcome a discussion how this would look like.  For example the new football field at Douglas Park is funded by Private money, fundraising, the Regina Minor Football association and some City funds.  These are the type of relationships we have to look at in the future.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

Growing up I had a 1 speed red bike and grew up on a hill, a very, very steep hill. It provided a fitness advantage to me because I had to ride up that hill, many times walked my bike up that hill (especially after soccer practice), but the training at a young age made me stronger and gave me an advantage over other kids.  I rode my bike everywhere and eventually got a 10 speed when I was 13.  I was able to play competitive soccer and played Football at the University of Western Ontario because of my speed and core strength which I attribute to riding my bike at an early age (for about 10 years) and building the appropriate muscles.

I have a mountain bike and usually take it out once per year, but I don’t have the time anymore and envy those that still have the time to ride.

Jerry Flegel

No Response

Brian Sklar

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 9 Responses

Ward 9

Aiden Wotherspoon
Jason Mancinelli

Aidan Wotherspoon

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

As I have stated elsewhere, Regina needs to become a safe city for bicycles; right now unfortunately it is not. With the exception of the Devonian pathways, it is impossible to commute by bicycle from one area of the city to another. The two bike lanes we currently have downtown are pathetic. What we need is to have major streets like McCarthy Boulevard and Sherwood Drive with dedicated bike lanes. If necessary, I would support bike lane designs that place a physical barrier between the bikes and vehicular traffic. I would also support a plan to expand the Devonian pathway system to make the north eastern part of the city accessible from it via northwest link.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities. Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

Given the area of the city I am in, I would start by concentrating on new developments. I will work to make sure that safety for cyclists is built into the structural fabric of Coopertown. I talked elsewhere of my plan to have pedestrian lights and sidewalks on Courtney Street before the new schools open to keep students safe. I would propose an expansion of the Northwest Link pathway at least up to Whelan drive to provide a logical entry point into the new development, and the existing neighbourhood to the east of the road. I would also propose producing a map, to be updated regularly, designed for cyclists that highlight the safest roads and pathways in the city to help commuters map out safe routes to different areas of the city.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

The last bike ride I did was from a friend’s house by Al Ritchie to my place by McLurg School. I liked the scenery starting at Candy Cane Park and taking the bike paths through Mount Royal up to Hansen Park and taking the scenic route on the North Storm Channel pathway by St. Josphat.

Jason Mancinelli

Election 2016 Ward 8 Responses

Ward 8

David Chapados

Michael O’Donnell

Gene Howie

Ron Blashill

David Chapados

 

  1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

I would push for more well defined bike lanes, also upgrades and extensions to existing bike paths. I believe bike lanes could be made a lot safer by creating grade differences or meridians between bike lanes and automotive traffic. It would make bike lanes more clearly defined, improving safety for all user groups. We have a great bike path system that runs through the city, but a lot of sections of it are in need of immediate repair. Also a lot of newer developments haven’t been connected to existing infrastructure as well as they could’ve been. If we looked at bike paths the same way we do streets, and actually made them a functional way to get around the city. I’m sure we would see a major increase in usage, which in turn would lessen traffic congestion and stress on roadways.

  1. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

 I think adding connecting paths from the already existing bike path would be the most efficient way to hasten development. As well bike lanes that are already in place outside of the bike path need to be made safer and advertised better. I believe if you wouldn’t go for a bike ride with your child on it, it doesn’t qualify as a bike lane.

  1. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

To be completely honest I haven’t rode a bike in sometime. Although I do use the bike path and bike lanes a couple times a week, skating to work, the skate park in Wascana park, or going for a roll with my daughter. I absolutely love getting out and having fun as a means to stay in good shape and healthy. Whether It’s skating to work at 5:00 am or the 9km warm up skate from my house in Rosemont to the skate park beside the Science Centre. As a fairly regular user of bicycle infrastructure I’m definitely for promoting it’s usage and improving it’s functionality.

Michael O’Donnell

No Response

Gene Howie

No Response

Ron Blashill

No Response

Election 2016 Ward 7 Responses

Ward 7

James Dulmage
Leanne McKay
Nishchal Bhagi
Jonas Cossette
Sharron Bryce
Ameer Gill
John Gross

James Dulmage

1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

Regina needs a complete review of bike paths and roads to determine how best to tackle this issue. We need to develop more options for cyclists, especially in terms of road space. I am ready to stand up and support anything that creates a benefit to the environment and to the health of people. I do feel that cyclists should be encouraged to take a road safety course for both the benefit of themselves and others on the road, so I would be strongly for developing this type of program. We could also start offering a subsidy to encourage more cycling.

2. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

We need to change our way of thinking. We need to focus on how to get people moving about a city in a healthy and environmentally friendly fashion. It requires smart investment and good planning techniques to execute this. I would work with the rest of the city and its citizens, especially current cyclists, to develop a plan for our city to begin converting existing roads to include attractive bike paths and to ensure new roads have this option right off the bat.

3. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

It’s been a long time! I haven’t rode a bike since I was a teenager, but it would have been on the bike paths near Walker School! I loved being able to just relax and enjoy the scenery while doing something healthy.

Leanne McKay

1. Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

Cities that develop a strong cycling strategy see escalating ridership and economic, social and environmental benefits. In detail, what does Regina need and what are you ready to support to develop a municipal cycling strategy?

My only caution in developing a municipal cycling strategy is the 5 or 6-month period when weather allows bike travel in Regina. Spending taxpayer money on anything that is not a universal service is not at the top of my list – spending taxpayer money on something not at the top of my list and only a viable service part of the year is something that will have to be considered a want rather than a need. Please do not interpret this to mean I do not support your position or efforts, on the contrary – I totally support what you are doing and what you stand for. That being said, however, we have some very upset taxpayers who just shelled out 73 million for a football stadium. That isn’t even on most people’s wants list much less the needs list.

Bike policy and infrastructure are on my lists right there with outdoor swimming pools, ball diamonds, parks etc, which are the responsibility of the City. My position is very firm with respect to wants vs needs. Take care of the needs first, we need water; sewer, streets; sidewalks, garbage pick-up; disposal, police; firemen. Those universal services are used by everyone and needed by every citizen of this City. Within the streets and sidewalks services, we need I support designated bike lanes and I also intend to promote the concept of the community bicycle program.

It is a free bike lending program – very successful and really addresses Regina’s unique challenges of bicycle theft. Bikes are free to use – there are pick-up and return depots throughout the city and I honestly believe it would help enormously with the parking issue in downtown Regina.

I am sure you know more about the Community Bike Program concept than I do and I will be the first to consult with your Organization on how Regina’s Program should look.

Sadly, new construction of protected bike paths and routes is something that will have to wait. We have to pay for the football stadium first. You may thank all the incumbents for that debt on Regina taxpayers.

However, you cast your vote remember it was the incumbent Mayor and Councill who put us in debt for a facility we did not need and many did not even want. It is high time the many stops paying for the wants of the few.

2. The federal government has already committed to developing a 10-year infrastructure investment plan that will include significant new funding in green infrastructure to create sustainable and livable communities.  Knowing the link between infrastructure and ridership, what would do to hasten the construction of local networks of protected bicycle infrastructure?

I have addressed that concern to some extent in the previous answer. We can’t do anything until that football stadium is paid for. If we have Federal or Provincial money that needs to be matched by the City to take advantage of a ten-year investment plan we can’t do it. I would so love to but we have a football stadium and the incumbent Mayor and Council don’t seem to realize just how badly that is going to restrict and eliminate tending to the things we really need and want. A new Mayor and Council are bound to honour the commitments of the previous administration so our hands will be tied to some extent but I do hope new faces and new minds on Council will better reflect the actual desires of the majority, not the privileged elite.

3. Where did you last ride a bicycle, and what do you love most about it?

I am 63 years old and suffer a visual impairment so it has been about five or six years since I rode a bike.

The last time I rode a bike I was sharing a beautiful and sunny Fall day here in Regina near the Pasqua Hospital with my eldest daughter.  We were just soaking in the sun and enjoying each other’s company.  She passed away just a little over two years later.  It is a memory burned into my brain that I will never forget.

In the past when I was a young woman I biked everywhere.  I had a baby seat on the back of my bike when I was in University and I found that biking helped me maintain an amazing figure and a fabulous tan and I never had to worry about where the heck to park.  It saved so much time, and money and kept me healthy and beautiful and I loved it.  All my girlfriends started riding bikes with baby seats and pull behind carts and we looked so amazing. We started to notice reduced stress levels from the exercise and fresh air and for me, it also provided a special little quiet time to meditate on the day that had just passed or the day ahead.  I really miss it and wish I could still ride.

Nishchal Bhagi

No Response

Jonas Cossette

No Response

Sharron Bryce

No Response

Ameer Gill

No Response

John Gross

No Response